Bank Facade Works, Manchester City Centre

Bank Facade Works, Manchester City Centre

Facade repairs and restoration, Manchester City Centre Lyons delivered on time and on budget for specialist FM client.  The bank’s façade had suffered deterioration to balusters at the top of the building, ball finial and upper level hood moulds. It’s common in buildings of this period to find spalling, but in some areas the stonework had become unsafe — a real concern since it was high above a busy city centre street in Manchester. Time was of the essence. The bank’s FM contractor called in Lyons to carry out a condition assessment. After producing an MEWP survey, detailed report and proposed schedule of works, in conjunction with the FM company, we were appointed to repair and restore the damaged stonework. Site preparations began. Given the urgency, the team carried out detailed templates so that the stone could be sawn and shaped out in our workshop as quickly as was humanly possible. Of course, ensuring public safety was crucial — especially to protect pedestrians and bank staff on the street below. Once all risks had been assessed and mitigated, the team pulled out all the stops, successfully fixing the new stonework on site and completing other isolated surface repairs — all on time and on budget. Details of Work Included: Detailed masonry condition survey Scheduling and templating for masonry Cutting out of deteriorated masonry Production of new masonry including new balusters, finial and hood mould indents Fixing of new masonry produced Pointing to match existing Isolated surface repairs to building Return to...
Tracery Repairs, St James’ Church, Brindle

Tracery Repairs, St James’ Church, Brindle

Tracery window repairs, St James' Church, Brindle Lyons Stonework undertook a programme of repairs and replacement to tracery windows at St James' Church, Brindle    A Grade II designated church in the Diocese of Blackburn, St James’ Church dates back to the 12th Century, with addition of the present tower in Perpendicular style around 1500. The nave, including the windows restored as part of our works was originally built in 1817.  The south side of the nave has three large arched windows, being the focus of the programme of work having suffered fracturing of the stone from corrosion of Iron pins over the years. Our repair works proceeded concurrently with restoration of the stained glass.      Brought in by conservation architects Equilibrium, Lyons worked through the process of matching the stone, condition assessments, planning the works, templating and scheduling the stone, cutting and shaping the stone before refixing the stone on site. A local gritstone was sourced to match existing masonry and taken in 5 tonne blocks to Lyons’ yard at Ramsbottom. The masons set out the templates in the workshop to make final measurements before sending through cutting lists to the saw shop for cutting of the block to sawn six sides pieces. The banker masons then using section and face templates set to work further cutting and shaping the tracery by hand. The finished masonry was sent to site where the fixer masons installed the new masonry. The process was fully completed in house without use of any external contractors. “I was lucky enough this week to see the sun shining through all three stained...
Private House, Liverpool

Private House, Liverpool

1860's Private House in Aigburth, Liverpool delfield was designed by a local architect and built as his family home.  The architect, Francis usher holme, was clearly a man of some standing. Stone for this family home was quarried in the grounds, creating a dramatic sunken garden. The estate was walled to all sides, with exemplary stone features which added to the feel of quality and taste. Francis’ practice was also responsible for Liverpool’s County Sessions House and the building which now houses the famous Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA), co-founded by Sir Paul McCartney.   Earlier this century, with the house still in private ownership, a project was begun to extend it significantly. Part way through, work had come to a halt. The client’s QS, who had worked with Lyons previously, asked us to correct some issues left by the previous contractor and to take the masonry element of the project through to completion. In the end, this was a major scheme, drawing on most of our in-house skills. Lyons built the new extensions, carried out external walling and steps, and performed substantial repairs to the original house. Details of Work Included: Completion of new-build extensions to the property. Scheduling and templating for masonry to complete new build. Production of new masonry. External garden walling. Feature arch. Sympathetic repairs to original building. Templating, production and site fixing of replacement stonework to original house. Lime pointing and repairs to boundary walls. New entrance piers. Main external steps to the property. Return to...